DISPLAY BRIEF

Due to the airshow permission issued by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) with additional restrictions for 2017, the decision has been reluctantly taken to cancel the flying display for both Saturday & Sunday.

This has been a difficult decision to take and one which we have worked throughout the night and this morning to resolve with the CAA.

Having received comment from an experienced display pilot with experience of displaying here at Cosby over several years, following his display last night, he raised legitimate concerns.  These concerns have been echoed amongst the other display pilots due to fly here this weekend.

We have a duty to ensure your safety, the safety of the display pilots, aircraft and the event as a whole.

WHILST WE FULLY APPRECIATE YOUR DISAPPOINTMENT AT THIS NEWS THIS WILL NOT AFFECT ANY OTHER ASPECT OF THIS EVENT.

FROM THE EVENT ORGANISER AND THE FLYING DISPLAY DIRECTOR.

OPENING TIMES

Friday 8th September 2017
9am – 5pm

(no official airshow / re-enacment battle on this day)

Saturday 9th & Sunday 10th September 2017
9am – 5pm



NORTH AMERICAN P-51D
MUSTANG KH775 ‘G-AS’ G-SHWN - the Victory Show 2017

NORTH AMERICAN P-51D MUSTANG
KH775 ‘G-AS’ G-SHWN

SEE DISPLAY BRIEF AT THE TOP OF THE PAGE

The North American Aviation P-­51 Mustang was an American long-­range, single-­seat fighter and fighter bomber used during World War II, the Korean War and other conflicts. The Mustang was conceived, designed and built by North American Aviation (NAA) in response to a specification issued directly to NAA by the British Purchasing Commission. The prototype NA-­73X airframe was rolled out on 9 September 1940, 102 days after the contract was signed and, with an engine installed, first flew on 26 October.

The Mustang was originally designed to use the Allison V-­1710 engine, which had limited high-­altitude performance. It was fifirst flflown operationally by the Royal Air Force (RAF) as a tactical-­-­reconnaissance aircraft and fifighter-­-­bomber (Mustang Mk I). The addition of the Rolls-­Royce Merlin to the P-­51B/C model transformed the Mustang's performance at altitudes above 15,000 ft, matching or bettering that of the Luftwaffe's fighters.The definitive version, the P-­51D, was powered by the Packard V-­1650-­7, a license-­built version of the Rolls-­Royce Merlin 60 series two-­stage two-­speed supercharged engine, and armed with six .50 caliber (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns.

From late 1943, P-­51Bs (supplemented by P-­51Ds from mid-­1944) were used by the USAAF's Eighth Air Force to escort bombers in raids over Germany, while the RAF's 2 TAF and the USAAF's Ninth Air Force used the Merlin-­-­powered Mustangs as fighter-­bombers, roles in which the Mustang helped ensure Allied air superiority in 1944. The P-­51 was also in service with Allied air forces in the North African, Mediterranean and Italian theaters, and saw limited service against the Japanese in the Pacific War. During World War II, Mustang pilots claimed 4,950 enemy aircraft shot down.

At the start of the Korean War, the Mustang was the main fighter of the United Nations until jet fighters such as the F-­86 took over this role;;;; the Mustang then became a specialized fifighter-­-­bomber. Despite the advent of jet fifighters, the Mustang remained in service with some air forces until the early 1980s. After World War II and the Korean War, many Mustangs were converted for civilian use, especially air racing, and increasingly, preserved and flown as historic warbird aircraft at airshows.

Mustang P-51D 44-73877 G-SHWN was built by North American Aviation at their Inglewood factory and delivered to the USAAF in July 1945. It is belived that this aircraft spent most of service life in various training units in the USA and was then transferred to the Canadian Air Force in January 1951. It was coded 9279 with the RCAF and served with the 403 City of Calgary Sqn until April 1959 when it was retired. It was declared surplus and passed through a few owners before Paul Feinfrock from Oklahoma purchased and it was then registered N167F. In 1974 it was flown to Vintage Aircraft Ltd at Fort Collins Colorado for a complete restoration. Prior to restoration the aircraft was sold to Anders Sæther who in 1980 commissioned a major restoration on what was a completely original airframe that had never been in an accident and was essentially in totally stock condition. At the commencement of this project the aircraft had logged 1,500 hrs.

1989 saw the shooting of the Warner Bros film Memphis Belle and Anders Sæther and the aircraft were contracted to fly in the film with another four Mustangs and was repainted in olive drab scheme coded AJ-N (356th FS of the 354 FG) with the nose art «Cisco». After the completion of filming the Mustang was flown by Scandinavian Historic Flight extensively on the European Air Show circuit often displayed by Mark Hanna, during which time it wore a few different paint schemes and ultimately in 2001 it was once more re-painted, this time in olive drab livery of «Old Crow» for which it became best known. It continued to be operated and flown by Scandinavian Historic Flight until 2010.

The current owner, Shaun Patrick, bought the aircraft in August 2012 where he immediately commisioned a large overhaul to be completed at Shoreham Airport, and a respray into the paint scheme the aircraft wears today. The scheme represents a Mustang IVA KH774 GA-S (44-11602) flown on ground attack missions over the Balkans along the Adriatic coast by 112 Sqdn's Lt Blanchford.

Retaining its nordic links, the Norwegian Spitfire Foundation will be responsible for its air show flying as the only Mustang in RAF livery. While not being displayed it will be operated by the Boultbee Flight Academy in order to give passenger rides.